Research + News | Topic: Extended Adolescence

Share Of American Young Adults Living With Their Parents Highest In 75 Years

According to a recent study by the Pew Research Center, 33% of 25-29 year olds lived with their parents or grandparents in 2016. Read the article here.

Adolescence Is a Gift, But Extended Adolescence Is a Trap

Nebraska senator Ben Sasse wants parents to get serious about shepherding kids into responsible adulthood. Read the article from Christianity Today here.

How to Get Your 20-Something Out of the Basement

A guest post from Andrew McPeak on the Growing Leaders blog. Read the blog here.

The Coddling Of The American Mind

In the name of emotional well-being, college students are increasingly demanding protection from words and ideas they don’t like. Here’s why that’s disastrous for education—and mental health.

Read the article here.

The 8 Life Skills All 18-Year-Olds Should Have: A Checklist For Parents

If we want our kids to have a shot at making it in the world as 18-year-olds, without the umbilical cord of the cell phone being their go-to solution in all manner of things, they’re going to need a set of basic life skills.

Read the rest of the article here.

This is Not a Day Care. It’s a University!

The President of Oklahoma Wesleyan University laments the current culture of self-absorbed and narcissistic teens. From his blog post:

“I have a message for this young man and all others who care to listen. That feeling of discomfort you have after listening to a sermon is called a conscience. An altar call is supposed to make you feel bad. It is supposed to make you feel guilty. The goal of many a good sermon is to get you to confess your sins—not coddle you in your selfishness. The primary objective of the Church and the Christian faith is your confession, not your self-actualization.”

Read the rest of the blog post here.

 

Declining Student Resilience: A Serious Problem for Colleges

College personnel everywhere are struggling with students’ increased neediness. Read the article here.

Former Stanford Dean Explains Why Helicopter Parenting Is Ruining A Generation Of Children

From the article:

Julie Lythcott-Haims noticed a disturbing trend during her decade as a dean of freshmen at Stanford University. Incoming students were brilliant and accomplished and virtually flawless, on paper. But with each year, more of them seemed incapable of taking care of themselves.

Read the rest of the article here.

Declining Student Resilience: A Serious Problem for Colleges

College personnel everywhere are struggling with students’ increased neediness.

Read the article here.

When Do College Students Believe Adulthood Begins?

Tim Elmore explains that for many college students, “the ages between 18 and 26 are a sort of sandbox, a chance to build castles and knock them down and experiment with different careers, knowing that none of them really count. Not yet anyway.”

Read his blog post here.